Cold War Games by Harry Blutstein

Cold War Games by Harry BlutsteinCold War Games: Spies, Subterfuge and Secret Operations at the 1956 Olympic Games by Harry Blutstein
Published by Bonnier Publishing Australia on August 1st 2017
Genres: History, Politics
Pages: 368
Format: Ebook
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads

The 1956 Melbourne Olympic Games have become known as the ‘friendly games’, but East-West rivalry ensured that they were anything but friendly. From the bloody semi-final water polo match between the USSR and Hungary, to the athletes who defected to the West, sport and politics collided during the Cold War.

Cold War Games shows vividly how the USSR and US exploited the Melbourne Olympic Games for propaganda, turning athletic fields, swimming pools and other sporting venues into battlefields in which each fought for supremacy.

There were glimmers of peace and solidarity. Cold War Games also tells the love story between Czechoslovak discus thrower Olga Fikotová and American hammer thrower Hal Connolly, and their struggle to overcome Cold War politics to marry.

Cold War Games is a lively, landmark book, with fresh information from ASIO files and newly discovered documents from archives in the USSR, US and Hungary, revealing secret operations in Melbourne, and showing just how pivotal the 1956 Olympic Games were for the great powers of the Cold War.

'Courage, fear, intrigue, brutality, generosity, love, hate, romance, humour, triumph and tragedy: they're all here in this superbly crafted book about the intimate entanglement of politics and sport during the deepest freeze of the global cold war. A major contribution to the history of international sport and politics'. — Frank Bongiorno

'Cold War Games is fast-paced, edgy and highly readable. Harry Blutstein crafts his gripping account with an impressive array of interviews, archival material and scholarship from across the globe. The result is a fascinating and accessible insight into a seminal moment in Olympic and Cold War history.' — Richard Mills, Lecturer in Modern European History, University of East Anglia

'This is a tale that is long overdue. Mr Blutstein's well-researched history of the chicanery of the Soviets in Olympic competition is a compelling read.' — Jon Henricks, Melbourne 1956 and Rome 1960 Swimming Dual Gold Medallist

The 1956 olympic games were something of a high point in Australia’s sporting history, and looking at it through the rosy lens of history and nostalgia it is easy to ignore the political, and diplomatic environment which the games took place in. As a student in history, I find it fascinating that there was all of this backstory going on behind the scenes, while on the face of it there was a sporting contest happening between the various countries.

Blutstein covers far more in this book than just the 1956 games, as the story goes back to the beginning of the Cold War, and tracks the lives and history of a number of the athletes who would play a significant role in games. Strangely enough most of the focus was on the athletes from Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, and the political pressures they were under to perform. A lot of the book is devoted to the stories of the athletes who were planning to, or ultimately did defect as a result of their visit to Melbourne.

I found this book was probably not as interesting as I had hoped it would be. It was interesting in that it gave some great context to the political games which went on behind the Games, but I don’t think it is a book for everyone.

I received a review copy from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

The Tethered Mage by Melissa Caruso

The Tethered Mage by Melissa CarusoThe Tethered Mage (Swords and Fire #1) by Melissa Caruso
Published by Orbit on October 24th 2017
Genres: Fantasy
Pages: 480
Format: Ebook
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
two-half-stars

In the Raverran Empire, magic is scarce and those born with power are strictly controlled -- taken as children and conscripted into the Falcon Army. Zaira has lived her life on the streets to avoid this fate, hiding her mage-mark and thieving to survive. But hers is a rare and dangerous magic, one that threatens the entire empire.

Lady Amalia Cornaro was never meant to be a Falconer. Heiress and scholar, she was born into a treacherous world of political machinations.

But fate has bound the heir and the mage. And as war looms on the horizon, a single spark could turn their city into a pyre.

The Tethered Mage is the first novel in a spellbinding new fantasy series.

The Tethered Mage is the first book in a series, set in a world where magic is scarce, and those who wield the power are tightly controlled by the ruler of the land. They are known as falcons, and when their talents are discovered they are bound to someone who is able to control their use of magic – a Falconer.

The main character of the novel is a young noblewoman who is busy going about her stereotypically air-headed lifestyle when she is rudely interrupted by a fire warlock attempting to burn the city to the ground. Of course, she is doing it in self-defence, but that seems an unnecessarily violent way of going about it, so our erstwhile heroine tethers the warlock, and thus begins a hate-hate relationship between them as they each learn to control their abilities.

There is a whole lot of courtly intrigue, and pomp and circumstance in this novel, which really isn’t my thing, and I felt that it dragged out unnecessarily as a result. The author has some interesting ideas, but so much of the tension seems thoroughly contrived as a result of the magic system that is used in the book. I found the main character quite useless, as most of her power is derived from her access to someone else’s power – either from being the heir to a noble house, or from her Falcon’s magical abilities. She has relationships and friendships with a lot of other characters in the novel, but mostly she seems to drift through it as a spectator on this journey.

Zaira – the Falcon in question – on the other hand was a much more interesting character for me, and although we do get to learn a lot more about her backstory, I would rather have had her as the main character. But that wouldn’t work because of the contrivances of the magic and or the governance system.

At the end of the day, I just felt like this was a pretty forgettable novel that took far too long to go basically nowhere. There is some sort of phoney war going on, but not as you’d really know it based on the more romantic elements the author chooses to spend most of her time on. I would need to find some very strong reasons to go and read the others in the series.

I received a review copy from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

two-half-stars
Rating Report
Plot
two-stars
Characters
three-stars
Writing
three-stars
Pacing
two-half-stars
Cover
three-stars
Overall: two-half-stars

Code Breakers by Craig Collie

Code Breakers by Craig CollieCode Breakers: Inside the shadow world of signals intelligence in Australia's two Bletchley Parks by Craig Collie
Published by Allen & Unwin on March 29th 2017
Genres: War
Pages: 400
Format: Ebook
Goodreads
five-stars

Code Breakers by Craig Collie is the story of the Australian efforts in World War 2 to spy on the Japanese military through the use of radio interception and code-breaking. Working alongside, and not infrequently, in opposition to, the Americans and British who were making similar efforts at places such as Bletchley Park.

I am fascinated that even after more than 70 years, there are still new stories emerging from the shadows of secrecy which covered a lot of this kind of work. There have been numerous books written, and movies made about the work at Bletchley Park, but I was unaware of the role that Australia had in intercepting and breaking the codes which contributed so heavily to winning the war. A large portion of the book takes place in my home town of Brisbane, but like many stories, it seems to have fallen by the wayside over the years.

Code Breakers is not a technical manual on code breaking, by any means, and does not allow itself to be bogged down in the nitty gritty of mathematics. Instead, it is the story of the people who were doing the work, in Australia, and on the ground in various jungles of the South Pacific – and various other countries. While reading the story of the competitive nature of the units who were working on the codes, it is somewhat astounding that anyone managed to do anything constructive. Whether it was inter-service rivalry between the army and the navy, or between the various allied countries, everyone wanted to claim credit, and no one wanted to share their toys with the other children.

This is a very readable book, and should be of interest to anyone with an interest in the history of code breaking, or Australia’s involvement in the Second World War. I am looking forward to reading more books by this author.

five-stars
Rating Report
Characters
five-stars
Writing
five-stars
Pacing
five-stars
Overall: five-stars

Scramble by Norman Gelb

Scramble by Norman GelbScramble: A Narrative History of the Battle of Britain by Norman Gelb
Published by Endeavour Press on August 9th 2016
Genres: History, War
Pages: 316
Format: Ebook
Goodreads
four-stars

1940. Britain stands alone against Nazi Germany.
Only the RAF can protect Britain from falling to the Germans.
Scramble is the thrilling story of the epic battle that turned the tide of Nazi invasion in the summer of 1940.

In more than 450 first-hand accounts, combatants, civilians, politicians, journalists and others who were part of the day-to-day heroism that was England’s finest hour tell a tale of war from an individual perspective.
And what a revealing tale it is — of the shortages of every kind, with groundcrew racing against time to get the battered planes operational, to the tactical battles and controversies revealed by Air Ministry papers.
Above all, it evokes the terror, rage and frustration of Britain besieged, and the spirit which held it all together: the courage to live to fight another day.

The Battle of Britain is probably one of the most well-known periods in history, filled with heroic deeds, and inspiring speeches. One nation stood alone against the might of the seemingly all-conquering Nazis. What then might another book bring to this narrative, that has not been told before?

Scramble is the story of the Battle of Britain told through quotes and interviews with the fighting men and women, and other English residents who suffered through the fighting. It begins with the evacuation of Dunkirk and carries the reader through to the end of that period of the Second World War.

I was surprised at how much I actually learned through reading Scramble – it is typically popularised as a battle between the Spitfires and Hurricanes, and the Messerschmidts, but there was much more on both sides.

I suppose if there is one downside to the book, it is the way that it is structured. It is composed almost entirely through the words of the people who were there, which is a strength, but also a weakness in that you don’t get the sense of the overall picture of what was going on at the time. While you get a good sense of the action which was taking place, it is difficult to put it in perspective.

I found Scramble to be a refreshing look at the Battle of Britain, and if you can look past the lack of a narrative structure, you will find the book speaks through the voices of the real people who were involved.

four-stars
Rating Report
Pacing
four-stars
Cover
four-stars
Overall: four-stars

The Dark Net by Benjamin Percy

The Dark Net by Benjamin PercyThe Dark Net by Benjamin Percy
Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt on August 1st 2017
Genres: Technology
Pages: 272
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
one-star

Hell on earth is only one click of a mouse away…

The Dark Net is real. An anonymous and often criminal arena that exists in the secret far reaches of the Web, some use it to manage Bitcoins, pirate movies and music, or traffic in drugs and stolen goods. And now an ancient darkness is gathering there as well. This force is threatening to spread virally into the real world unless it can be stopped by members of a ragtag crew:

Twelve-year-old Hannah -- who has been fitted with the Mirage, a high-tech visual prosthetic to combat her blindness-- wonders why she sees shadows surrounding some people.

Lela, a technophobic journalist, has stumbled upon a story nobody wants her to uncover.

Mike Juniper, a one-time child evangelist who suffers from personal and literal demons, has an arsenal of weapons stored in the basement of the homeless shelter he runs.

And Derek, a hacker with a cause, believes himself a soldier of the Internet, part of a cyber army akin to Anonymous.

They have no idea what the Dark Net really contains.

Set in present-day Portland, The Dark Net is a cracked-mirror version of the digital nightmare we already live in, a timely and wildly imaginative techno-thriller about the evil that lurks in real and virtual spaces, and the power of a united few to fight back

I finished The Dark Net a few days ago, and held off writing a review to allow myself to stew over it to see if I could make any sense whatsoever of what the hell I just read. At first glance, this novel is trying its damnedest to be something of a mix between a Gibson-esque future, and a modern day techno thriller. And at a surface level, I suppose it is. The closer you look, and the further you read, The Dark Net begins to unravel and all you are left with is a twisted hot mess of a novel that is impossible to follow, and has no depth or substance to it. I have left the over-long synopsis in with my review, as the novel defies my attempts to explain its plot.

I got about 20% of the way through the novel and realised that I had no idea what the names of any characters were, and by about 60% of the way through I realised I didn’t know what was going on. There are so many moving parts to this novel, but how they are connected, and if they are connected is a mystery buried deeper than the latest incarnation of The Silk Road. I finished this book but only through sheer bloodymindedness at actually finding a relatively promising cyberpunk novel.

There was something which nagged at me for a long time while reading the book, in that the premise and setup reminded me of another novel. I realised that it was the WWW series by Robert J Sawyer, which also featured a blind girl who used a maguffin to see the world around her. I made it through the first book in that series before it jumped the shark – something involving an orangutan addressing the United Nations as I recall… The point is, I didn’t like that series, and this felt like a poor man’s ripoff of that better written, if equally preposterous series.

The parts of The Dark Net which were original were not particularly interesting, and the parts which were interesting were not original. It lacked any kind of cohesive structure, and it just felt like an attempt at writing an experimental literary piece. There’s a reason I don’t generally write literary fiction, and it is largely exemplified in just how bloody annoying this book was. This is an over-long, over-written, under-structured pile of dreck that should not have seen the light of day. I was disappointed at what this book was compared to what it might have been, and that is the greatest sin an author can commit for me – to disappoint the reader.

Please, for the love of god, run away from this novel as fast as you can. Re-read Neuromancer, or one of Neal Stephenson’s early cyberpunk novels instead. You will thank me for it.

I received a copy from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review..

one-star
Rating Report
Plot
two-stars
Characters
one-star
Writing
half-star
Cover
one-star
Overall: one-star

Change Agent by Daniel Suarez

Change Agent by Daniel SuarezChange Agent by Daniel Suarez
Published by Dutton Books on April 18th 2017
Genres: Sci-Fi, Technology
Pages: 416
Format: Ebook
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
three-stars

On a crowded train platform, Interpol agent Kenneth Durand feels the sting of a needle— and his transformation begins. . . . In 2045 Kenneth Durand leads Interpol’s most effective team against genetic crime, hunting down black market labs that perform "vanity edits" on human embryos for a price.

Change Agent takes place in the near future, where embryos are able to be genetically altered to suit their parents’ wishes, correct defects, and all sorts of other things besides. The main character Kenneth Durand is an Interpol agent charged with tracking down criminals who exploit these new technologies.

We are barely introduced to the main characters when Durand is attacked by a criminal gang, and his identity is stolen, and he is transformed into the likeness, in appearance, and at a genetic level of the leader of that gang, marking him as a wanted man.

In an effort to recover his identity, clear his name and reunite with his loving family, he must go on a weird and wonderful quest across South-east Asia to track down the real culprits, and find a way to undo the unthinkable.

I suppose the origin of this story is the question of whether scientists should do something just because they can do it. There are also questions of ethics, and morality raised in the book, and the author throws in a hefty dose of philosophy. These are some of the debates that are going on in society – around the testing of embryos for things like Down Syndrome. I am not entirely sold on the so-called science involved, particularly in such a near future setting – only 30 years from now – and the level of dystopia was a little distracting at times.

I’ll be honest, I thought a lot of the world tour, and drama was manufactured largely for the purposes of having a philosophical discussion, rather than actually advancing the plot, and there were times when I felt like “Here we go again…” but the author never felt preachy.

My other beef with the novel was that – for the most part, I never really got a good sense of the ultimate bad guy in the story. There were a few encounters with the underlings, but most of the tension was from the nameless and shapeless government forces that were either chasing Durand, or were just in the area being dangerous.

I enjoyed the main character’s dilemma, and the weird and wonderful people he meets along the way, but only a couple of them seemed to have their own motivations.

Change Agent was competently written thriller that is trying very hard to be edgy and interesting, but I think it is ultimately forgettable.

I received a review copy from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

three-stars
Rating Report
Plot
four-stars
Characters
three-half-stars
Writing
three-half-stars
Pacing
two-half-stars
Cover
two-half-stars
Overall: three-stars

Daughter of Ash by Matthew S Cox

Daughter of Ash by Matthew S CoxDaughter of Ash by Matthew S. Cox
Published by Curiosity Quills Press on March 7th 2017
Genres: Post-Apocalyptic
Pages: 359
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
five-stars

Designed to be the perfect assassin, Kate is as beautiful as she is deadly―everything she touches, burns.

The government attempted to engineer a pyrokinetic the likes of which the world had never seen, but their plans went awry. Her power to command fire as a living extension of her psyche was more than they had hoped for, except for one problem. Her skin is hot enough to destroy most materials on contact. Useless for infiltration, they declared the project a failure and slated her for disposal at the age of seven.

This is the second book of Matthew S Cox’s that I have read, after the previous book in the series – Grey Ronin. I immediately fell in love with the style of that novel, and was pleasantly surprised to find that his style continued into the fourth book in the series – Daughter of Ash.

The good thing about this series is that – although they are connected to each other – they are self-contained stories that don’t necessarily require a great deal of prior knowledge about the other books in the series.

The main character is a genetically engineered super-weapon who wields the power of pyrokinetics. She is able to summon fireballs at will, but those same powers mean that her internal temperature is several thousand degrees, and she burns anything she comes into contact with. Be it clothing, shoes, or other human beings, Kate is a literal danger to anyone she comes into contact with.

She serves as an enforcer for a local mob boss, but her old life, and her old masters come back to haunt her, and she goes on a journey to find her origins, and whether there are any answers, or cures for her condition.

The book really reminded me of a mix between the Fallout universe, and the television show Dark Angel. It takes the ‘best’ of these things – a post-apocalyptic wasteland environment, with so many people just trying to survive; and very relatable human super-soldiers – and smashes them together with excellent results.

Cox writes in a very accessible style, and his characters feel very relatable, and fleshed out. I thoroughly enjoyed Daughter of Ash, and would recommend it to fans of post-apocalyptic fiction, and the Fallout series.

I received a review copy from the publisher through NetGalley.

five-stars
Rating Report
Plot
five-stars
Characters
five-stars
Writing
five-stars
Pacing
five-stars
Cover
five-stars
Overall: five-stars

Nighthawk by Clive Cussler

Nighthawk by Clive CusslerNighthawk by Clive Cussler
Published by G.P. Putnam's Sons on June 2017
Genres: Thriller
Pages: 464
Goodreads
three-stars

The world s most dazzling new technological advance may turn out to be mankind s last, unless the NUMA crew can beat the clock. The thrilling new NUMA Files novel from the #1 New York Times bestselling grand master of adventure.

When the most advanced aircraft ever designed vanishes over the South Pacific, Kurt Austin and Joe Zavala are drawn into a deadly contest to locate the fallen machine. Russia and China covet the radical technology, but the United States worries about a darker problem. They know what others don t that the X-37 is carrying a dangerous secret, a payload of exotic matter, extracted from the upper reaches of the atmosphere and stored at a temperature near absolute zero. As long as it remains frozen, the cargo is inert, but if it thaws, it will unleash a catastrophe of nearly unthinkable proportions.

From the Galapagos Islands to the jungles of South America to an icy mountain lake many believe to be the birthplace of the Inca, the entire NUMA team will risk everything in an effort to avert disaster . . . but they may be caught in a race that no one can win."

Nighthawk is another in the long-running series by Clive Cussler and his co-authors, this time starring Kurt Austin and his band of merry men and women as they get carried off into another adventure for which they’re probably underprepared. They are dragged into a mission to recover a top-secret military space plane, but what they uncover is a deadly game of brinksmanship between a number of competing nations, vying to recover the space plane’s secret contents.

I have mixed feelings about the Clive Cussler books, because I always feel like they’re trying to be a bit too much of an academic version of a military thriller. But I find they are much more character-driven than some of the bog standard thrillers going around.

With that said, however, while there are an interesting and diverse cast of good guys in this book, only one of the bad guys truly stands out as being of any importance. I never found out enough about the rest of the bad guys to really care about them.

While the action is all very exciting, and the pace of the writing is relentless, there just feels like a lack of depth underlying it all. I don’t really understand why or how NUMA is the only major government force working on this problem, other than for the purposes of there being a book about it.

I feel like there are so many of these books now, and I think I lost any genuine interest back in the days when they were actually being written by Clive Cussler. This is an utterly forgettable airport novel that you will probably enjoy while reading it, but you won’t remember it in a week. If that’s enough for you then have at it, but I’m looking for a better standard of airport novel.

three-stars
Rating Report
Plot
three-half-stars
Characters
three-stars
Writing
three-half-stars
Pacing
four-stars
Cover
three-stars
Overall: three-stars

Confidential Source Ninety-Six by Roman Caribe, Rob Cea

Confidential Source Ninety-Six by Roman Caribe, Rob CeaConfidential Source Ninety-Six by C.S. 96, Rob Cea
Published by Hachette Books on August 22nd 2017
Genres: Biography, True Crime
Pages: 304
Format: Ebook
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
four-stars

In CONFIDENTIAL SOURCE NINETY-SIX, the man who goes by the pseudonym Roman Caribe recounts the harrowing life he's lead as the most successful confidential informant in the history of U.S. law enforcement. A onetime mastermind narcotics distributor, Caribe first saw the tragedies caused by the drug trade with his own eyes as he got to know the women involved with his business partner and the children that they raised. By the time Caribe was arrested in a drug bust, he had made up his mind to get out of the business for good. Rather than beat the charges as his lawyer advised him to, he would confess, flip sides, and work for the federal government.

Confidential Source Ninety-Six is the tale of Roman Caribe – a former drug dealer who – after being arrested with a truckload of drugs decided to turn into a confidential informant, and would go on to work as an undercover agent taking down other drug operations. It provides an insight into the operations of both the drug lords responsible for so much pain in the United States; and the law enforcement agents who are trying to stop them.

I was actually somewhat surprised that I found Caribe to be quite a likable and charismatic figure, and I really enjoyed his emotional journey. I have read other memoirs by former Mafia bosses, or other criminals who were flipped to the ‘good side’ after being arrested, and there’s just something disingenuous about the whole thing. It is one thing to turn away from one’s criminal past voluntarily, but often it feels like they did it for purely selfish reasons.

The book begins with Caribe’s early life and devotes a reasonable amount of pages to explaining how he went into the ‘life’, and found himself trapped with a series of psychotic drug lords and incompetent henchmen. You really get the sense that these are real people, and they are colourful and very dangerous.

As the book progresses, the author’s life shifts to one of deception, and even greater danger, as he struggles to protect his family from getting dragged into his dangerous work as an undercover operative. I think that is ultimately where the humanity comes from, that he does not shy away from the real danger and emotions that he is going through.

If there is a downside to this book it is that the author is being sold as “the most successful confidential informant in the history of US law enforcement”, and it is difficult to get an overall sense of the accomplishments of the author. He describes a number of operations he participated in, and the financial rewards he received from those, and I have to be honest, they didn’t seem that big or important. I felt that the author could have done a better job of wrapping and capping the story to justify the aforementioned claim.

This is a fascinating look at the war on drugs, from both sides of the line. I found it very readable, and a very human story filled with realistic and fascinating characters.

I received a review copy from the published through NetGalley.

four-stars
Rating Report
Characters
four-stars
Writing
four-stars
Pacing
three-half-stars
Cover
three-half-stars
Overall: four-stars

Bounty Hunter 4/3 by Jason Delgado, Chris Martin

Bounty Hunter 4/3 by Jason Delgado, Chris MartinBounty Hunter 4/3: From Marine Scout Sniper to MARSOC's First Lead Sniper Instructor by Jason Delgado, Chris Martin
Published by St. Martin's Press on September 3rd 2017
Genres: Memoir, War
Pages: 352
Format: Ebook
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
four-stars

Bounty Hunter 4/3 is the latest in a string of personal accounts written by special forces soldiers, and other military personnel recounting their experiences in the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. It is the tale of Jason Delgado, a Marine sniper who was involved in the thick of some of the deadly warfare which took place in the city of Husaybah.

It is in the vein of autobiographies like Chris Kyle’s American Sniper, and others, and is a very personal look at what it takes to be a special forces operative on the front lines. The book begins with the author growing up in The Bronx, and the events which led him to signing up as a Marine, and then going through the arduous training required to become a Scout Sniper. I am not saying that some of the other accounts glamourise this experience by any means, but Delgado brings a very down to earth viewpoint at the bloody nature of the business of war. By his own admission he embarked on this journey with something of an unrealistic expectation of what it took, however through his training he had this stripped away.

As an on-the-ground viewpoint, Bounty Hunter 4/3 focuses primarily on the very real, gritty experience of warfare on the street. Danger lurks around every corner, and there is a sense of the powerlessness he felt in being unable to take action to protect the locals, or the brotherhood he was fighting alongside. The downside is that it can be difficult to get a sense of the battlefield as a whole, and the author acknowledges that not many people remember the name of Husaybah, where a significant portion of the action takes place in the latter half of the book.

It is undeniable that there is a personal cost for anyone who goes to war. The author had to witness the deaths, and maimings of many of his comrades in arms, which he had to bear psychologically when he returned home. I think this is the greatest strength of the book, that going beyond the outer bravado, and spitshined image of warriors marching off to war, there are injuries which go beyond the visible. Bounty Hunter takes us inside the head of one such warrior, and into his personal family life which had to bear the cost as well.

As mentioned before, this is not the first book which covers some of this territory, but it is a highly personal, intriguing look at the life of a US Marine sniper. I enjoyed reading the book, and found it quite moving in places.

I received a review copy through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

four-stars
Rating Report
Writing
four-half-stars
Pacing
three-half-stars
Cover
four-stars
Overall: four-stars