Non-Fiction

Stalingrad by Antony Beevor

Antony Beevor is one of my favourite nonfiction authors, and Stalingrad is typical of his impeccably researched, well-spun tales that takes the reader behind the scenes of the battle for Stalingrad, which was one of the great turning points of the Second World War. It is difficult to sum up the excellence of this book.... Read More »

The Rise of Big Data Policing by Andrew Guthrie Ferguson

Big data has become an integral part of our lives, whether we are aware of it or not. With its use in a range of industries, including public safety, as a society we would do well to keep ourselves informed at what we are doing, and allowing to be done in the name of security... Read More »

Cold War Games by Harry Blutstein

The 1956 olympic games were something of a high point in Australia’s sporting history, and looking at it through the rosy lens of history and nostalgia it is easy to ignore the political, and diplomatic environment which the games took place in. As a student in history, I find it fascinating that there was all... Read More »

A very expensive poison by Luke Harding

Russia is something of an enigma to most people in the west, and our perceptions of the country, its politicians, and history are definitely coloured by what we see in the media. Luke Harding’s book seeks to lift some of the veil which surrounds the country in his book ‘A very expensive poison’ which describes... Read More »

Zodiac by Robert Graysmith

Zodiac is the story of one man’s search to identify the infamous Zodiac killer who haunted the lives of the people of San Francisco and Northern California starting in the 1960s. The author was an editorial cartoonist, who worked alongside, and apart from the police officers who were investigating the horrific murders and assault, ever... Read More »

Klaus Barbie by Tom Bower

I think that most people who have even a minimum of knowledge about the second world war know who Klaus Barbie is, at least at an intellectual level. One of the most notorious, or infamous Nazi figures, with a nickname like The Butcher of Lyons, he instantly evokes a certain image and emotion. As a student... Read More »

Apollo 8 by Jeffrey Kluger

Apollo 8 is the story of one of the early manned space missions, the first which broke the bonds of Earth and took the first trip around the moon ever undertaken by a human being. But it is so much more than that – following the lives of the men and their families throughout the... Read More »

Rise of the Luftwaffe & The Grand Fleet

I decided to review these two historical non-fiction books together, as one is relatively short, and would probably not warrant a review post on its own. The two books are: The Rise of the Luftwaffe by Herbert Molloy Mason The Grand Fleet by H.C. Ferraby The Rise of the Luftwaffe The Rise of the Luftwaffe... Read More »

The Pope of Physics by Gino Segre, Bettina Hoerlin

The Pope of Physics by Gino Segre, Bettina HoerlinThe Pope of Physics is a book about the life of one of the innovative masters of physics, Enrico Fermi, who immigrated from Italy to America, and took part in one of the biggest science experiments in modern history – the construction of the atomic bomb during the second world war. I was surprised to... Read More »

The Fleet at Flood Tide by James D Hornfischer

The Fleet at Flood Tide by James D HornfischerThe Fleet at Flood Tide is an interesting, and thorough look at the latter part of the War in the Pacific, when the United States was coming into its supremacy as a naval power. The author draws on historical sources, as well as interviews to put human faces on a war. This might have been... Read More »

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